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Thread: Private schools with money problems?

  1. #1

    Default Private schools with money problems?

    Saw this on the Atlantic Thread, take it however you desire.

    http://collegemeltdown.blogspot.com/...of_30.html?m=1

  2. #2

    Default Re: Private schools with money problems?

    Quote Originally Posted by UFOILERFAN View Post
    Saw this on the Atlantic Thread, take it however you desire.

    http://collegemeltdown.blogspot.com/...of_30.html?m=1
    I looked at it briefly. The writer said he cut and pasted the list from a 2017 Forbes article. I clicked on the link to the Forbes article and the writer of that one said that he was reviewing 2014 data. So that list was formulated based on info from 5 years ago.

    I read the Forbes methodology a bit - grading favors schools with large endowments or state funding that are not dependent upon tuition dollars for survival. So, I guess we shouldn't be surprised that the list is mostly smaller private schools that don't have huge endowments.

    While the info may be dated, I don't think any of us would deny that small private schools (and specifically the ones without huge endowment) are collectively facing an uphill battle these days.

  3. Default Re: Private schools with money problems?

    Public University spending is a Ponzi scheme and unfortunately this victimizes the small private schools. Take Illinois for example....state bleeding red, several 4 year state funded schools have experienced massive enrollment decreases, while at the same time increased tuition virtually every year. Illinois raises taxes and then funnels more money into these same fiscally irresponsible universities. Catching a falling knife simply doesn’t work, but throwing a bone for political favor is almost a guarantee.

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueBlood View Post
    I looked at it briefly. The writer said he cut and pasted the list from a 2017 Forbes article. I clicked on the link to the Forbes article and the writer of that one said that he was reviewing 2014 data. So that list was formulated based on info from 5 years ago.

    I read the Forbes methodology a bit - grading favors schools with large endowments or state funding that are not dependent upon tuition dollars for survival. So, I guess we shouldn't be surprised that the list is mostly smaller private schools that don't have huge endowments.

    While the info may be dated, I don't think any of us would deny that small private schools (and specifically the ones without huge endowment) are collectively facing an uphill battle these days.

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