Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 22 of 22

Thread: Fully funded vs not fully funded

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Canyon, Texas
    Posts
    15,747
    Contribute to D2
    Rep Power
    658376

    Default Re: Fully funded vs not fully funded

    Quote Originally Posted by Scrub View Post
    But in the case of highly talented students with good test scores (oh, and who can also shoot and rebound), coaches can get a "freebie." CJ Hester, Evan French, Alex Falk, and other players like that have, I believe, qualified for the university's Scholars program. I don't know the specifics, but it's highly possible that guys like these received darn near a full ride as STUDENTS using the university's academic scholarships, so the basketball team wouldn't have to use one of their 10 scholarships (or at least not much of one--maybe just chipping in for room and board, thereby spreading a single scholarship among a variety of talented academic students) on guys like that. So, if you recruit smart kids who can also play ball--which WLU does seem to do with some regularity--your 3 "non-scholarship" players on the roster aren't necessarily walk-ons; they're guys with academic money. Imagine if you can get an Alex Falk with academic money (based on his test scores), and then STILL have 10 more scholly's to spend. That's pretty smart allocation if you can pull it off.

    And none of this takes into the account the two years of FREE Dan Monteroso (given that both of his parents are employees of the university and can cash in a tuition benefit, as I understand it). Obviously, Dante Lombardi works the same way at IUP I imagine.
    In theory, you're supposition that academically talented students receive academic scholarship money, thus freeing up athletic scholarship money for another player, sounds reasonable. But, that changes from school to school.

    For example (one of dozens back then), several years ago, at West Texas A&M, we had a student, Tyler Cooper, son of the BB HC at WT. He was a 4.0 student majoring in pre-med and biology. 4.0 for 4 years. I remember his dad, Rick Cooper, telling me of his experience at the time getting academic money. He was told by the admission/scholarship people; "He's an athlete, just give him an athletic scholarship. Why would we waste money that could go to another student when Tyler's getting an athletic scholarship?" That was the mindset then of administrators. (A couple months ago, Tyler Cooper opened his own practice in Orthopedic Surgery in Amarillo, after ten years of med school, internship, residency, and fellowship training). I think it's much better today at WT because of the pro-athletics Presidents and leadership we've had since then. Today, if a kid can qualify for academic aid, that is looked to first. In fact our coaches seek out top students so that the available athletic scholarship dollars are stretched. But, the point is, that can change from school to school, from administrator to administrator. WT could be getting 30 or 40 additional scholarships for it's athletic programs via student/athletes receiving academic money, where maybe the same thing isn't happening at another conference school.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Lalaland
    Posts
    10,195
    Rep Power
    21956

    Default Re: Fully funded vs not fully funded

    Quote Originally Posted by BuffaloChip View Post
    In theory, you're supposition that academically talented students receive academic scholarship money, thus freeing up athletic scholarship money for another player, sounds reasonable. But, that changes from school to school.

    For example (one of dozens back then), several years ago, at West Texas A&M, we had a student, Tyler Cooper, son of the BB HC at WT. He was a 4.0 student majoring in pre-med and biology. 4.0 for 4 years. I remember his dad, Rick Cooper, telling me of his experience at the time getting academic money. He was told by the admission/scholarship people; "He's an athlete, just give him an athletic scholarship. Why would we waste money that could go to another student when Tyler's getting an athletic scholarship?" That was the mindset then of administrators. (A couple months ago, Tyler Cooper opened his own practice in Orthopedic Surgery in Amarillo, after ten years of med school, internship, residency, and fellowship training). I think it's much better today at WT because of the pro-athletics Presidents and leadership we've had since then. Today, if a kid can qualify for academic aid, that is looked to first. In fact our coaches seek out top students so that the available athletic scholarship dollars are stretched. But, the point is, that can change from school to school, from administrator to administrator. WT could be getting 30 or 40 additional scholarships for it's athletic programs via student/athletes receiving academic money, where maybe the same thing isn't happening at another conference school.
    That goes to other forms of aid as well. Why would a school with enrollment growth give free room and board to an athlete when there's a non-athlete willing to pay full boat? As opposed to other schools with declining enrollment that can give an athlete free room and board (athletic aid) to get that student-athlete enrolled and paying tuition.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •